Abdominoplasty: Information, Procedure, and Risks

An abdominoplasty or better known as the “tummy tuck” is a surgical procedure used to make the waist thinner and firmer. This procedure removes excess fat and additional skin to create a slimmer look. The abdominoplasty can also restore weakened and or separated muscles to create and maintain a firmer abdomen.

How is the Procedure Done?

Typically an abdominoplasty procedure is done in the order of medication, incision, repair, closing of the incision, and then once awake, the patient reviews the results.

Anesthesia: Medication is supplied in order to ensure your comfort during the abdominoplasty. Either intravenous sedation or general anesthesia will be used. Typically, based on your own medical record or procedure, your doctor will decide which works best for you.

To begin, an incision is made horizontally from the belly button to the pubic hairline. Depending on how much excess skin is in the area, the incision may be shorter or longer. Once the incision is made, the skin is lifted and the separated muscles are repaired.

Once repaired, the stomach skin is then pulled back down. Any additional or excess skin is trimmed, and the remaining skin is then sutured or “stitched” together. A new hole will be created for the belly button to be pulled through as well.

Closing the Incision: There are multiple ways to close the incision, things such as sutures or stitches, clips, and skin adhesives can be used.
Once awake, you will get to see the results of the procedure. The abdominoplasty is done to fit your body type, ensuring the correct proportions.

You can get a full walkthrough of the procedure by following this link to WedMD.

What are the Risks?

As with anything, there are risks that should be noted when someone decides to undergo an abdominoplasty. It is important that anyone who undergoes a procedure such as an abdominoplasty fully understands the risks associated with doing so. Some of the most common risks and complications include:

  • Anesthesia risks
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Persistent Pain
  • Death of Fatty Tissue
  • Scarring

You can find a full list of risks by following this link to Mayo Clinic.

Most people see limited complications. These risks are fully discussed when you meet with a plastic surgeon. In order to consent to an abdominoplasty, you must sign a consent form saying you understand the risks and complications.

For those who are interested in receiving information on their local area abdominoplasty procedures and doctors, they can simply google the procedure and then follow it with their location. For example: “abdominoplasty columbus oh.”

A full abdominoplasty can take between 1-5 hours, and it is typically considered a safe and efficient cosmetic procedure. However, it is always vital that you talk to your doctor about any questions or concerns that you may have beforehand. Understanding the procedure and it’s known risks can aid in making your final decision.